Why liking the same deviant behavior doesn’t lead to great sex.

When it comes to sex, do opposites attract? Or does like like like? Psychologists at the University of Rochester examined this topic, surveying 304 heterosexual couples in relationships lasting from one month to 34 years.

The study, reported in a Pacific Standard article entitled “Is it important to have the same sexual desires as your partner?,” suggests that sexual satisfaction depends on a couples’ desires complementing each other, not just being similar

Imagine that Jack enjoys giving oral sex and that Jill enjoys receiving oral sex. Their preferences are not similar, but they complement each other’s in ways that their idiosyncratic desires can be met.

The study confirmed that women whose partners know what they like are more sexually satisfied than women whose partners are clueless. No, really. 

Put another way, when a guy who likes receiving blow jobs (i.e. all men) hooks up with a woman who pretends to like giving blow jobs (i.e. prostitutes), the result is great satisfaction. 

And finally, the study found that the sky is blue, water is wet, and evolution is real. 

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